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MLA 2022 ANNUAL CONFERENCE BREAKOUT SESSIONS

*Schedule is subject to change

Wednesday, October 19, 2022

3:15 – 4:15 PM  |  4:30 – 5:30 PM

Thursday, October 20, 2022

9:45 – 10:45 AM  |  11:00 AM – 12:00 PM  |  1:15 – 2:15 PM  |  3:00 – 4:00 PM

Friday, October 21, 2022

9:00 – 10:00 AM  |  10:15 – 11:15 AM 

 


Wednesday | 3:15 – 4:15 PM

Yo quiero leer: Impacting Migrant Families Through Literacy

Track:  Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community. 

Recommended Audience: Great for small and rural libraries

Armed with a grant, enthusiasm, and a vision of how to provide a literacy outreach program to migrant farmworkers and their families, Fennville District Library set out on a new journey. Learn how the library identified, engaged and developed relationships in their local migrant community. Recognize library programs, services and activities that impact migrant communities. Explore the challenges and opportunities staff utilized to create a replicable model of outreach services to a traditionally underserved community.

Outcomes

  • Participants will identify potential strategic partners in their community.
  • Participants will be able to build sustainable services for an underserved population.
  • Participants will develop best practices for respectful and responsive outreach.

Speaker

Teresa Kline HeadshotTeresa Kline
Fennville District Library

Since 2013, Teresa Kline has been the Director of the Fennville District Library. Her library experience includes management positions in public, special and business libraries throughout the State of Michigan. Teresa received a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and a Master of Arts in Library Science at the University of Michigan. In 2021 Teresa received the Michigan Library Association’s Public Librarian of the Year award.

 

 

Digital Collection Developments in the Mitten

Track:  Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for academics

This session consists of three presentations about the current digital collection development activities in the state of Michigan. The first presentation is a case study of the issues involved in documenting and photographing more than 100 murals in the Eastern Market area of Detroit for an online exhibition titled "Detroit Mural Map". Next is a research study examining digital collection development policies in academic libraries at institutions of higher education in Michigan. A surprising sketch of these policies emerged & their essential components are identified. The final presentation explores the selection criteria used for digital collection development, and how representative these collections are of their local communities. In each presentation, there is an underlying interest in exploring digital collections as conduits (or barriers) for the exchange of information across multiple constituencies.

Outcomes

  • Participants will identify and express components in digital collection development policies.
  • Participants will assess their organization’s selection criteria to increase diversity, equity, and inclusion in their digital collections.
  • Participants will plan for future digital collection developments at project and programmatic levels

Speakers

Jean BeaydoinJoan Beaudoin 
Wayne State University

Joan E. Beaudoin is an Associate Professor in the School of Information Sciences at Wayne State University where she teaches and conducts research on metadata, information organization, digital libraries, digital preservation, museum informatics, and visual information. In addition to a Ph.d. in Information Studies at Drexel University, she holds a MLIS from Drexel University, a MA in art history from Temple University, and a BA in art history from Massachusetts College of Art.

 

 

Megan BruceMeg Bruce
Wayne State University

Meg Bruce is nearing the end of her MLIS journey in the School of Information Studies at Wayne State University. She has particularly strong skills in the area of metadata and object description, and has produced several digital collections while at WSU. She has held various positions within local public libraries in Michigan while working towards her MLIS and hopes to continue to expand her knowledge and experience through a career in librarianship.

 

 

Cameron SochaCameron Socha
Wayne State University

Cameron Socha is completing his MLIS degree in the School of Information Studies at Wayne State University. He has produced several digital collections of note during his time at WSU, and hopes to continue adding to his knowledge and skills in this area in a professional position within a library in the near future.

 

 

 

Building a Culture of Wellbeing At Your Library

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees 

A supportive work environment leads to employees who are more engaged and happier at work. But what does that look like in practice? This workshop will help you begin to build a culture of wellbeing at your library by making small shifts in your thinking and practices. Participants will experiment with practical ways to bridge the divide between management and staff by helping staff get engaged; avoiding triggering stress responses in staff; promoting a sense of belonging and psychological safety; using team members’ unique strengths; and, respecting staff as whole people.

Outcomes

  • Participants will understand what triggers stress responses in people and how to avoid those responses while promoting a sense of belonging and psychological safety.
  • Participants will have tools to discover and develop their unique strengths and spot the strengths in staff members.
  • Participants will have developed a strategy that allows them to take a pause to recenter and refocus before and after reacting. 

Speakers

Jenny Kobiela-MondorJenny Kobiela-Mondor
Midwest Collaborative for Library Services

Jenny is a Library Strategist at MCLS. Previously, she was the Assistant Director at Eckhart Public Library in Indiana. Jenny has a Masters in Library Science from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. She has a Certificate in Creating Wellbeing from The Wellbeing Lab, attended The Harwood Institute’s Public Innovators Lab, and has education and experience in many areas, including change management, Appreciative Inquiry, community engagement, inclusivity, and intellectual freedom.

 

 

Lissa KrullLissa Krull
Midwest Collaborative for Library Services

Lissa has 27 years of experience in public library administration, marketing, and consulting. She has a passion for educating, motivating, and inspiring staff to reach their fullest potential. Lissa holds a Certificate in Creating Wellbeing from The Wellbeing Lab and has received training in community engagement, project management, and facilitation from The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, Center for Appreciative Inquiry, Association for Talent Development, and We Can Work It Out, LLC.

 

 

Outreach on Wheels: Book Bikes for Beginners

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future.

Recommended Audience: Great for small and rural libraries 

Aren’t book bikes the coolest? In Summer 2021, Spring Lake District Library started biking around town on our custom book bike, talking to people about the library, checking out books, and hosting outdoor storytimes. In this program, you’ll learn about the process we went through to make our book bike go from dream to reality. First, we’ll tell you how much the bike cost and where we found the funds (and the plans) to build it. Next, we’ll talk about the actual construction of the book bike. Then, we’ll talk about where we take the book bike, what we do once we’re out in our community with it, and our future bike-riding plans. Throughout, we’ll give you an opportunity to ask questions and we’ll share some lessons we learned along the way. Let’s just say, we know what works, but we also know what really doesn’t work.

Outcomes

  • Participants will know more about the logistics of having a book bike.
  • Participants will be able to evaluate if a book bike is a realistic option for their library.
  • Participants will brainstorm a list of possible locations within their own community where their book bike might be welcomed.

Speakers 

Maggie McKeithan Maggie McKeithan
Spring Lake District Library

Maggie McKeithan has been the Library Director at Spring Lake District Library since 2019. She is also Vice President of the Lakeland Library Cooperative Board and a Board Member of READ Ottawa.

 

 

 

Alison TaylorAlison Taylor
Spring Lake District Library

Alison Taylor has been the Library Services Manager at Spring Lake District Library since 2018. She is also the Co-Chair of the Continuing Education Committee for Lakeland Library Cooperative.

 

 

 

Personalizing Your Presence: Social Media That's FUNctional

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Burned out by the grind of daily social media posting across several platforms, the social media team at PDL decided to use the results of their library's new strategic plan as an opportunity to start fresh and make social media fun again. With an eye on intentional posting and inclusivity, they created a new social media system with the goal to reduce stress and burnout, to make posting across platforms fun and functional, and that ultimately better reflects and engages with the community.

Outcomes

  • Participants will leave with the knowledge of a concrete organizational system that will ease their posting responsibilities.
  • Participants will have gained ideas of intentional social media posts that best align with their libraries' mission statement and/or strategic plan.
  • Participants will leave with tools and strategies that help them better define the voice of their social media.

Speakers

Jessica KeelerJessica Keeler
Plymouth District Library

Jessica Keeler is a Youth Services Librarian in Plymouth, Michigan. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre with a Design & Technology concentration from the University of Toledo and a Master in Library and Information Science from Wayne State University. She has served on Michigan Library Association's YouPer Award Committee since 2019. Jessica has a passion for middle-grade lit, STEAM in Youth Services, and dogs of all shapes and sizes.

 

 

Sarah Vargas  Sarah Vargas  
Plymouth District Library

Sarah Vargas is an Adult Services Librarian in Plymouth, Michigan. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Literature from Eastern Michigan University and a Master of Science in Library Information and Science from Wayne State University. Her special interests in librarianship include collection diversity, accessibility and disability inclusion, and Indigenous visibility.

 

 

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Wednesday | 4:30 – 5:30 PM

Michigan Humanities' Programs and Grants for Your Library

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for small and rural libraries, great for students 

Michigan Humanities (MH) will highlight the following programs:

  • The Great Michigan Read (GMR), is a statewide literacy program focusing on humanities themes. GMR partners receive free books, readers' and teachers' guides, bookmarks, and opportunities for funding.
  • Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and state humanities councils, brings traveling exhibits to libraries, museums, and other organizations in rural towns.
  • The Arts & Humanities Touring Grant program is a resource for libraries looking to find arts and humanities performers to present programming to library patrons.
  • Bridging Michigan Grants provide Michigan nonprofits with up to $2,500 that can be used to spark in-depth thinking and conversation about the persistent social, economic, and cultural issues of systemic inequity that divide our communities.

The presentation will include an overview of each program and grant opportunity, details on how to apply or register, and Q&A.

Outcomes

  • Participants will learn about MH's program and grant opportunities.
  • Participants will learn how to apply and/or register for MH's program and grant opportunities.
  • Participants will learn how to use these programs and grants to their advantage.

Speakers

Estee SchlennerEstee Schlenner
Michigan Humanities

Estee is the Programs and Communications Coordinator at Michigan Humanities. She oversees Poetry Out Loud and the Arts & Humanities Touring Grant program. Estee has a B.A. in English from Michigan State University.

 

 

 

Ashley RossAshley Ross
Michigan Humanities

Ashley is the Director of Programs at Michigan Humanities. She oversees statewide programs throughout the state including the Great Michigan Read and the Smithsonian’s Museum on Main Street. Ashley has a M.A. in Anthropology with a concentration in Museum Studies.

 

 

 

Making Tough Topics as Easy as 1-2-3

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

During this time of political turmoil, pandemic fatigue, and community divisiveness, library workers are struggling to help their communities navigate tough topics. In order to address this growing and ongoing need, Clinton-Macomb Public Library has developed an annual initiative, the 1-2-3 Program, designed to provide a forum for community members to learn, discuss, and connect. Each year, our library spends four months tackling a timely topic through intentional reading and programming in order to foster learning for everyone and understanding in our community.

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to design a community forum for their patrons to discuss timely topics.
  • Participants will create and implement at least two programs around a timely topic.
  • Participants will be able to generate staff buy-in for a community discussion program.

Speakers

Amy YoungAmy Young
Clinton-Macomb Public Library

Amy Young is the Head of Adult Services at the Clinton-Macomb Public Library. She received her MLIS from Wayne State University in 2009. She spent the first ten years of her career in youth services and school outreach before transitioning to adult services. She is particularly interested in EDI practices in the profession, the future of digital media, and protecting the freedom to read for all.

 

 

Celia MulderCelia Mulder
Clinton-Macomb Public Library

Celia Mulder (they/them) is the Head of Collection Management and System Administration at the Clinton-Macomb Public Library in Michigan. They received their MSI in Library and Information Services from the University of Michigan in 2018. After starting in reference, they quickly transitioned to technical services where they enjoy discussing classification with anyone who will engage. They’ve served as the chair of the CMPL equity, diversity, and inclusion committee for the past three years.

 

 

Lisa MulvennaLisa Mulvenna
Clinton-Macomb Public Library

Lisa has 20 years of presenting highly energetic storytime and early literacy programming. As a manager, she now works with staff to develop new services, programs, and outreach for ages 0-18 and their families. Lisa was the recipient of the 2012 Frances H. Pletz Award for Excellence in Service to Youth, given by the Michigan Library Association.

 

 

It Takes A Village: Anchor Institutions and Public Health

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

The well-being of a community can be measured in many ways. However, new research supports the notion that the most important factor in longevity and health is interpersonal relationships. More precisely, it’s impacted by two fundamental types of relationships: close friends and frequent acquaintances. As the demographics of many areas change over the coming decades, anchor institutions such as libraries will play an increasingly important role in the social determinants of health within the communities they serve. It’s a role libraries should understand and embrace.

Outcomes

  • Participants will learn how shifting demographics will transform the well-being of many communities and what impact social capital has on their future.
  • Participants will define strategies outlining how libraries can provide experiences that can foster close friendships and frequent acquaintances within the community.
  • Participants will discuss research outlining the importance of the modern village and the role libraries will play in future economic development strategies as effective anchor institutions. 

Speakers

Zachary BenedictZachary Benedict
MKM architecture + design

Zachary Benedict is a Principal at MKM architecture + design, a firm with over 30 years of experience in designing public libraries throughout the Midwest. With an extensive background in urban sociology, he has dedicated his career to understanding the connection between people and places - lecturing nationally on the importance of inclusive placemaking. In 2015 the American Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded him with the Young Architect Award in recognition of his work.

 

 

Charting the Path to a Digital Local History Room

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for academics, great for trustees

Local history rooms connect libraries’ communities to their past. How do we reach a wider audience while still protecting these often fragile or difficult-to-access collections? Digitization can increase and improve access to our history, but projects need to reach beyond digitization and include plans for access and long-term preservation. Meet three statewide experts who can help plan for and execute digitization, digital access, and digital preservation projects to help protect their valuable collections and share them with a broader audience.

Outcomes

  • Participants will emerge with knowledge about resources in the state for digitization, online access, and digital preservation and how to access those resources.
  • Participants will emerge with knowledge about how they work together to sustainably care for digital content over the long term.
  • Participants will emerge with knowledge about how the public can engage with that content and with their library online in order to foster a broader impact.

Speakers

Biz GalloBiz Gallo
Library of Michigan

Biz Gallo is the Statewide Digitization Initiatives Coordinator at the Library of Michigan. After spending the past eight years helping cultural heritage institutions across the country preserve their audiovisual collections through archival reformatting, she transitioned to state government in order to support libraries and cultural heritage organizations in Michigan to create, provide access to, and preserve digital collections.

 

 

Chelsea DenaultChelsea Denault
Midwest Collaborative for Library Services

Dr. Chelsea Denault spent a decade in the Public History field, serving in various roles at the Newberry Library, The Henry Ford, the Nantucket Historical Association, the Urban History Association, the Archdiocese of Chicago Archives & Records Center, and Landmarks Illinois. Chelsea earned her Ph.D. in U.S. History and M.A. in Public History from Loyola University Chicago, and is also an alumna of Albion College.

 

 

Richard AdlerRichard Adler
Michigan Service Hub

Richard Adler is the coordinator of the Michigan Service Hub working with cultural institutions in Michigan to help them share digital collections with the Digital Public Library of America and the state portal Michigan Memories. Before that, he was project manager for the CRMS-World project which evaluated the copyright of works in HathiTrust. Prior to his work at the University of Michigan he was an electronic records archivist at MSU and for ten years a book buyer at Borders Inc.

 

 

So You're Thinking About Forming a Union?

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees, great for students

Organizing with your coworkers has clear advantages. You’ll win greater job security, create conditions for more equitable pay, have a voice in decision-making, and increase library worker visibility in your community. There is immense potential in organizing a union, yet many don’t know the first steps or find themselves skeptical about or even hostile to the idea. Without strong unions, what happens to the future of libraries?

Outcomes

  • Participants will understand the characteristics of an organized workplace.
  • Participants will have reasons to consider organizing.
  • Participants will understand how to take the first steps to organizing.

Speakers

Photo Not AvailableAngelo Moreno
UAW Local 2256

Angelo Moreno is acting president of the East Lansing Public Library Workers Union, UAW 2256. He has been a library worker for just under ten years, starting as a page at his hometown and childhood library, Chippewa River District Library.

 

 

 

Meredith KahnMeredith Kahn
University of Michigan

Meredith Kahn is a librarian at the University of Michigan. She was a founding member of the organizing committee for LEO-GLAM, AFT-MI 6244, which represents librarians, archivists, and curators across all three U-M campuses.

 

 

Jon CurtissJon Curtiss
AFT Michigan, AFL-CIO

 

 

 

 

Katie Dover-TaylorKatie Dover-Taylor
William P. Faust Public Library of Westland

Katie Dover-Taylor (she/they) is a public librarian committed to equity and social justice in the workplace, in libraries, and beyond. Katie approaches anti-oppression work through both scholarship and organizing. In 2017, Katie co-authored the chapter "Disrupting Whiteness: Three Perspectives on White Anti-Racist Librarianship" for Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science. That same year, Katie and her colleagues organized a staff union during a turbulent time for their library, navigating targeted firings, public protests, and resignations by the library board and director. In 2018, she was elected chair of the Westland Library Union and led the team that successfully negotiated the library's first collective bargaining agreement. As a member of the Public Library Association (PLA) Committee on Equity, Diversity, Inclusion & Social Justice, Katie has regularly developed and led trainings for public library workers and contributed to Public Libraries magazine. In July 2020, she co-authored PLA's Call to Action for Public Library Workers to Address Racism. Katie moved to her current management role in 2021 and now strives to build a work culture of equity, creativity, and curiosity from a position with more institutional power.

 

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Thursday | 9:45 – 10:45 AM

Creating Inclusive and Diverse Youth Toy Kits

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Are you wanting to add circulating toys to your children’s collection but aren’t sure where to start? Hear about Ypsilanti District Library’s experience with creating play, STEM, sensory, and reading kits. Learn tips about selecting diverse and inclusive materials. processing and maintaining toys, procedure development, and cross departmental staff involvement. Get an exclusive peek inside YDL’s kits and participate in an interactive brainstorming session.

Outcomes

  • Participants will have a set of resources to refer to when developing their own youth kit program.
  • Participants will have a greater understanding of how to select books and manipulatives for youth play kits with multifaceted diversity in mind.
  • Participants will have more knowledge of what is involved with implementing youth kit procedures across multiple library departments.

Speakers

Liz PitcherLiz Pitcher
Ypsilanti District Library

Liz Pitcher is a youth services librarian at the Ypsilanti District Library. She received her MLIS from Wayne State University and has 10 years of experience working in libraries. She is passionate about digital literacy and equitable service for all ages. In her free time, Liz enjoys apparel sewing, hiking, and bread baking.

 

 

 

Psyche JettonPsyche Jetton
Ypsilanti District Library

Psyche Jetton is a youth librarian from Ypsilanti District Library. She received her MLIS from Kent State University and has since worked in both public and school libraries, and with all ages of youth and teens. When she is not working at the library, Psyche enjoys reading graphic novels, playing guitar, and visiting Michigan’s beautiful beaches.

 

 

Library Staff Onboarding and Development with MeL

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Build core competencies in your library team and provide robust access to your community through MeL. Learn how to use resources through the Michigan eLibrary to onboard new staff members, provide professional development opportunities for seasoned staff, and translate that knowledge to the community.  This session will provide everything you need to optimize your organization's staff development strategy.

Outcomes

  • Participants will identify at least one MeL resource to incorporate into their library staff onboard process.
  • Participants will identify at least one staff development activity that can be utilized during a staff meeting or professional development event.
  • Participants will identify at least one MeL resource that could be featured in library programming (in-house or outreach) after staff are trained.

Speaker

Heather Wood-GramzaHeather Wood-Gramza
Library of Michigan

Heather Wood-Gramza earned her MLIS from Wayne State University & has extensive experience in both K-5 and public library environments. For over 12 years, she has served in various public library roles such as teen wrangler, toddler whisperer, branch manager, and library director. Heather is now the Michigan eLibrary Coordinator and is committed to providing the very best statewide resource-sharing opportunities. In her free time, Heather enjoys exploring the outdoors and cooking.

 

 

Financing Library Construction and Improvement Projects with Bonds

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

This session will detail the financing options for a Michigan library. We will go into detail about the types of projects that can be funded with bonds, the various types of bond structures, and the Michigan laws that must be met when bonding for a capital project. In addition, we will walk through the timeline and steps of Michigan library financing and what items to think about when undertaking a bond issuance which will include the funding resource to repay the bond’s debt service.

Outcomes

  • Participants will better understand the financing options available to a Michigan library.
  • Participants will understand which professionals to contact when facing a capital project need.
  • Participants will understand the financing timeline of a capital project.

Speakers

Rj NaughtonR.J. Naughton
PFM Financial Advisors LLC

 

 

 

 

Library Marketing Plans: How to Write One

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for students

They don’t teach you marketing in library school, but they should. And one of the essentials of marketing is having a marketing plan. They help guide the complex process of marketing your library, establishing your brand identity, uncovering your library story, and more. What is a marketing plan and what needs to go into it?

  • Importance of updating your Strategic Plan
  • Market Research and segmentation
  • Your Core Message with EDI considerations
  • Basic Outline of your Marketing Plan
  • Templates to craft your own plan

Outcomes

  • Participants will become proficient in identifying target audiences and crafting specialized messages in their library communications.
  • Participants will be able to confidently use social media to advertise library resources, events and services and increase community awareness.
  • Participants will be able to create a marketing plan and editorial calendar to prepare marketing campaigns, targeted email messages, and more.

Speaker

Katie RothleyKatie Rothley
Northville District Library

Katie has been a librarian for over a decade, working in the adult services department until the last three years but gramming away for Southfield Public Library for fun. She now dabbles in press releases, social media marketing, and video editing for library work. She sometimes teaches painting classes for other libraries, on the side! Food, art, movies and music are some of her favorite things, along with cuddling her three dogs and two cats.

 

 

Owning Our Roles: Bridging the Humility Gap Part 1

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

Whether you’re a manager or staff member, you bring your whole, best self to work. Sometimes, others won’t meet your expectations or even your minimum requirements of their role. Yet we must all assume noble intent. We will share helpful mindsets such as practicing self-compassion, extending grace to others, reframing, and having a realistic sense of control over our choices. In this session, we will offer you a roadmap to develop personal resiliency skills in the office. 

Outcomes

  • Participants will name three resiliency skills critical to the workplace.
  • Participants will understand three ways to cultivate looking at coworkers' perspectives.

Speakers

Elissa ZimmerElissa Zimmer
Van Buren District Library

Elissa is an enthusiastic librarian with 10 years of library experience. She loves to discuss all things library and leadership and is passionate about making connections between people, ideas, and organizations. A Southwest Michigan native, she recently moved back to that part of the state to become the Districtwide Program Coordinator of Van Buren District Library.

 

 

Liz BreedLiz Breed
Jackson District Library

Liz Breed serves as the Assistant Director at Jackson District Library. In her 22 years in libraries, she developed operations management, project management, coaching, marketing, and training skills. She recently earned her MicroMasters in Instructional Design and Technology. Combined with a unique appreciation for the human element in online learning and her passion for supporting learning cultures, Liz creates environments where learners thrive.

 

 

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Thursday | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

From the Inside Out: Transforming the Flint Public Library

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

In the face of incredible adversity, the Flint Public Library transformed itself into a modern and flexible beacon for learning in the community.  With a vision centered on creating a facility that is just, confident, and aspirational, the library remade itself from the inside out. This session will describe how transformation begins, provide the tools and lessons learned in the process, and share the result. By bridging community and action, this future-forward process proves that transformation can happen at any scale.

Outcomes

  • Participants will learn from the inevitable challenges presented by a transformational library renovation.
  • Participants will understand the importance of equitable decision-making as a driver of modern library design.
  • Participants will explore the importance of community building and sharing as part of a successful project that connects and bridges. 

Speakers

Toby OlsenToby Olsen
OPN Architects

An Associate Principal at OPN Architects, Toby has been with the firm since 2009. He leads OPN’s library practice, including new and renovated library projects across the country. He is currently working on the design of a new branch for the Douglas County Libraries System in metro Denver, Colorado and the transformation of the Flint Public Library in Flint, Michigan. He relishes working with people, be it in public participation processes, strategic planning, or client visioning sessions.

 

 

Kay SchwartzKay Schwartz
Flint Public Library

Kay Schwartz left a career as a CPA to join the Flint Public Library 25 years ago, after earning her MLS from U of M. After spending 6 years as “Cybrarian” and 5 years as Head of Tech Services, Kay has served as Director since 2009. Kay guided the board, staff and public through changes made necessary by a crushing economic decline in Flint. Kay is now leading the Library’s transformation into a 21st-century learning center, with a vision “to be Flint’s go-to place to learn for life.” 

 

 

Owning Our Roles: Bridging the Humility Gap Part 2

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

In Part 2, we will take the roadmap presented in part 1 to explore different scenarios. Using role play and scripts, participants will practice ways to show resilience in the workplace and extend grace to ourselves and others, and learn how to reframe when things are difficult. Presenters will demonstrate these practices in addition to heavy participation in small groups and whole group discussions. There will be an emphasis on self-reflection.

Outcomes

  • Participants will name three resiliency skills critical to the workplace.
  • Participants will understand three ways to cultivate looking at coworkers' perspectives.

Speakers

Elissa ZimmerElissa Zimmer
Van Buren District Library

Elissa is an enthusiastic librarian with 10 years of library experience. She loves to discuss all things library and leadership and is passionate about making connections between people, ideas, and organizations. A Southwest Michigan native, she recently moved back to that part of the state to become the Districtwide Program Coordinator of Van Buren District Library.

 

 

Liz BreedLiz Breed
Jackson District Library

Liz Breed serves as the Assistant Director at Jackson District Library. In her 22 years in libraries, she developed operations management, project management, coaching, marketing, and training skills. She recently earned her MicroMasters in Instructional Design and Technology. Combined with a unique appreciation for the human elements in online learning and her passion for supporting learning cultures, Liz creates environments where learners thrive.

 

 

Inclusive Communication Tools for Non-Verbal Library Users

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Core Vocabulary Boards are a common tool for those who are non-verbal. Northville District Library partnered with Speech-Language Pathologists to create library-focused, low-tech core vocabulary boards for library patrons. We will provide a brief overview of AAC, share the importance of these tools, present our creation process, discuss training for this service, and offer guidance about how other libraries might also implement core boards.

Outcomes

  • Participants will have an understanding of what Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Core Vocabulary Boards are and the importance of these tools for the minimally verbal and non-verbal community.
  • Participants will have a base knowledge of resources that will support the creation and implementation of a core vocabulary board for their local community and library.
  • Participants will have a guide to help them navigate the necessary steps in creating and implementing this new service in their library.

Speakers

Catherine TrrautmanCathrine Trautman
Northville District Library

Cathrine Trautman graduated with her MLIS from Wayne State University in December 2019. Since September 2020, she has been a creative and enthusiastic Youth Services Librarian at Northville District Library. She finds inspiration for her work from her adventures with her husband, daughter, and two Siberian Huskies.

 

 

 

Liz GargaroLia Gargaro
Northville Public Schools

Lia Gargaro grew up going to Northville Schools and was a frequent patron of the Northville District Library. When she is not working with students with various degrees of complex communication needs, she can be found reading, researching new recipes, and spending time with her family.

 

 

 

Susan OlesonSusan Oleson
Northville Public Schools

At Northville Public Schools, Susan was instrumental in developing one of the first Public Schools educational programs in the US for children who were institutionalized due to their severe impairments. Her school program won Program of the Year from the Michigan Speech and Hearing Association and she recently received the very first Teacher of the Year for Region 7 of the Michigan Education Association. She retired 4 years ago, opened a private practice, and enjoys traveling.

 

 

I Can Do THAT With MeL?!

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for students

The MeL eResources provide content that can be used by a variety of audiences. Knowing tips and tricks to make the most of each product can help you leverage them to save budget dollars and supercharge your programming. Yes, you can do THAT with MeL! 

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to identify key features of the MeL eResources.
  • Participants will be able to use the MeL eResources to help fill gaps in library content.
  • Participants will be able to discover content that can be used for library programming.

Speaker

Laura Warren-GrossLaura Warren-Gross
Midwest Collaborative for Library Services

Laura Warren-Gross is the MeL Engagement Specialist for Public Libraries at the Midwest Collaborative for Library Services. An educator for over 25 years, Laura provides professional development for public library staff to support use of the MeL eResources.

 

 

 

Resources for Veterans and Becoming a MI Veteran Connector

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for small and rural libraries

This presentation will cover the free and confidential services offered to MI veterans and their families via Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency and the Veterans Health Administration. Programs to be highlighted include the Michigan Veterans Affairs Resource Service Center (1-800-MICH-VET), Buddy to Buddy Veteran Peer Mentorship, and emergency financial assistance via Michigan Veterans Trust Fund. The presentation will also cover aspects of MVAA's role within the SAMHSA Governor’s Challenge to Prevent Suicide Among Service Members, Veterans, and their Families in our communities across Michigan. This includes information on the MI Veteran Connector and our collaboration to create free outreach and educational training with the VA. With this collaboration, the Saginaw VA Community Engagement and Partnership Coordinator will highlight their new role within the VA along with the VA's public health approach to suicide prevention.

Outcomes

  • Participants will have an increased awareness of why and how to screen for military status.
  • Participants will have an increased awareness of the Veterans Crisis Line and the MDHHS Veteran Navigator Program within the State of MI.
  • Participants will have knowledge of resources available to Service Members, Veterans, and their families including how to make a referral for earned military-connected benefits. Participants will know how the above factors tie into suicide prevention in our veteran communities.

Speakers

Julie CortrightJulie Cortright
Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency

Julie Cortright is the Health and Welfare Analyst with Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency. Julie holds her degree from Ferris State University and licensure as a Nursing Home Administrator. Julie serves as the Co-Lead for the Michigan Governor’s Challenge Initiative which looks at innovative and community-based ways to end suicide in Service Members, Veterans, and their families. For 2022, Julie has been appointed to the MI Hospital Association’s Keystone Center Health Equity Task Force.

 

 

Andrea NortonAndrea Norton
Aleda E. Lutz VA Medical Care Facility

Andrea Norton is a USAF Veteran and Licensed Master Social Worker at the Aleda E. Lutz VAMC in Saginaw MI. Andrea served in the USAF for 8 _ years as an intelligence analyst and as part of a mobile training team. Ms. Norton left the Air Force in 2007 to pursue her education at Michigan State University. She has worked with and advocated for Veterans her entire career. She is excited about the brand-new VA position as a Community Engagement & Partnership Coordinator.

 

 

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Thursday | 1:15 – 2:15 PM 

But What About The Children? Law & Children in the Library

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

Public libraries have a cherished image in the American cultural psyche as welcoming, safe and idyllic places for children. However, the realities of modern public libraries including controversies over choices of reading material, photography, exposure to online content, films, video games, and the library of things have prompted the question, "What is a public library's responsibility towards the safety and oversight of children in the library?" This program will discuss the ways laws address a public library's duty towards children, how those expectations are often at odds with patron and library staff inclinations, and suggest tips and resources for libraries to create and revise policies to better reflect the realities of public libraries and children while maintaining a warm, welcoming, and engaging environment.

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to identify the characteristics of reasonable legally compliant policies to serve and protect child patrons.
  • Participants will be able to discover strategies and practical steps to employ to address bias and censoring behavior or policies.
  • Participants will discover strategies and resources to assist in training staff to resist confusing personal ideals and opinions with library policies regarding children in the library. 

Speaker

Clare MembielaClare Membiela
Library of Michigan

As the Library Law Consultant at the Library of Michigan, Clare helps public libraries understand and manage legal issues that impact library services. Before joining the Library of Michigan, Clare was theAssociate Director for the WMU Cooley Law School Libraries. She has an M.L.S. from Southern Connecticut State University, a J.D. from the University of Miami, and 30 years of law library experience.

 

 

Michigan Arts and Culture Council Grants for Libraries

Track:  Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

This session will provide an overview of upcoming grant programs available to libraries and discuss the application and review processes. Recent MACC library awardees will also share their experiences and projects.

Outcomes

  • Learn about the grant programs available to libraries through the Michigan Arts and Culture Council.
  • Better understand the MACC grant review process.
  • Hear from recent awardees about their experiences and projects.

Speaker

Jeff GarrettJeff Garrett
Michigan Arts and Cultural Council

Jeff Garrett is the Operational Support Program Manager for the State of Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs. Previously, Jeff served as Director of the Art School at the Flint Institute of Arts. He has teaching experience in Michigan Public Schools, has been adjunct faculty at Vincennes University, Saginaw Valley State University, and Mott College, and was Head of the Art & Design Department at Crowder College. He received a Master of Fine Arts degree in Ceramics with Distinction from Indiana State University.

 

 

Leadership in Difficult Times: Directors Helping Directors

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for students

Being a director is difficult enough without the added challenges of a pandemic, First Amendment Audits, the increasing number of challenges to materials, and trying to fill open positions during the Great Resignation. A panel of directors at different stages in their careers, from the recently appointed to the veterans, will discuss how they handle adversity, go-to resources, and professional networks to tap into for fellow directors, directors-in-training, or anyone in a leadership role at their library.

Outcomes

  • Be aware of professional networks and resources to utilize for help with issues of concern facing the library.
  • Be able to self-reflect and assess how they handle conflict.
  • Be able to develop their leadership communication skills within their organization.

Speakers

Chase McMunnChase McMunn
Orion Township Public Library

Chase McMunn serves as Director for the Orion Township Public Library, a position he has held since January of 2022. He is a native of Michigan but worked most of his professional life in California as a librarian and branch manager for the County of Los Angles, and as the Assistant Director of Libraries for the County of San Luis Obispo. He received his Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Michigan, and Master of Library and Information Science from UCLA.

 

 

James PughJames Pugh
Orion Township Public Library

James Pugh has worked in libraries since 2015 and has done everything from circulation to material processing to program planning to collection development and more. Pugh is currently studying in the Masters of Management in Library and Information Science program through the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California.

 

 

Cathy RussCathy Russ
West Bloomfield Township Public Library

Cathleen Russ is the director of the West Bloomfield Twp Public Library. Prior to that, she was Director of the Troy Public Library from 2007-2020. From 2010-2014, she was an Adjunct Professor at Wayne State University, teaching Library Administration and Management. Prior to her role at TPL, Russ served as Director of the Chelsea District Library and the Center Line Public Library. She holds a Master of Library and Information Science from Wayne State University.

 

 

Alyson LobertAlyson Lobert
Commerce Township Community Library

Alyson Lobert is the Library Director at the Commerce Township Community Library. Lobert was appointed to her position in January 2020; she helms a fantastic team of 30 employees providing a wide array of library services to the 43,000 residents of Commerce Township. Prior to joining CTCL, Lobert served as the library director of Walled Lake City Library for six years. In 2010, she received her Master’s degree in Library and Information Science at Wayne State University.

 

 

Wesleyann JohnsonWesleyann Johnson
Center Line Public Library

Wesleyann Johnson has been the Director of Center Line Public Library since April 2019, although she has been employed by the City of Center Line since February 2016. She has a Master of Library and Information Science Degree from Wayne State University and a Master of Arts in History Degree from Madonna University.

 

 

 

The Post-Pandemic Library According to Directors & Designers

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

The pandemic shut many public amenities down, and disadvantaged residents suffered at a disproportionate rate. Creative opportunities like loanable hotspots, mobile libraries, and cutting-edge content distribution allowed libraries to continue to connect patrons to essential resources. In this session, two library directors, a design architect, and an interior designer will discuss how these new opportunities can be leveraged and maximized for ongoing service to patrons in different contexts.

Outcomes

  • Participants will understand the resources needed to implement a basic or advanced recording studio for both synchronous and asynchronous video presentations.
  • Participants will be able to describe the key elements of implementing a resource station (staffed and/or unstaffed) for people wrestling with homelessness.
  • Participants will be able to outline the costs (direct and indirect) of launching and supporting a mobile library.

Speakers

Dennis JensenDennis Jensen
C2AE

Dennis Jensen, AIA, ALA, MLA, is a 42-year veteran of the design industry. A trained architect, Dennis has dedicated thousands of hours to developing designs for over 30 public libraries. He develops creative solutions to client-specific needs by actively listening and transforming ideas into real designs using concept sketches. He plans within budget to design attractive, lasting environments that promote their intended use.

 

 

Hannah SnyderHannah Snyder
C2AE

Hannah Snyder, Associate IIDA, has spent the past six years as an interior designer at C2AE creating beautiful, functional environments for clients such as East Lansing Public Library, White Lake Township Library, and Portage District Library. Hannah believes empathy is the cornerstone of design; environments evoke strong human emotions, which drive behaviors. Hannah’s inspiration comes from everyday joy, bold graphic design, bright colors, and fine art with a whimsical modern style.

 

 

Ryan WieberRyan Wieber
Kalamazoo Public Library

Ryan Wieber has been Director at Kalamazoo Public Library since 2017 and has 23 years of experience leading southwest Michigan libraries. He is the President of MLA, a member of the MLA Advocacy and Legislative Committee, and serves on two municipal authorities. KPL received the 2021 Community Inclusion Award from Disability Network Southwest Michigan, which recognizes and celebrates organizations that embrace disability and work to ensure inclusion for its employees, community, and customers.

 

 

Kristin ShelleyKristin Shelley
East Lansing Public Library

Kristin Shelley has been the Director of the East Lansing Public Library since 2011. In 2015, Kristin secured a $1.5 million donation for renovations at ELPL. In 2017, ELPL received the Library of Michigan State Librarian’s Excellence Award. Kristin is the former president of the MLA Board of Directors; a member of the MLA Legislative Committee, the Library of Michigan Board, and the Mid-Michigan Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission; and an active member of the One Book, One Community Committee.

 

 

Students' Positions on Library Boards

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience:  Great for trustees

Government for Tomorrow (GFT) is a nonprofit with the mission to help cities and schools create student positions on local government boards. The organization, started by a northern Michigan high schooler just over a year ago, has helped thousands of students be represented by peers since its creation. GFT helps develop the student position, go into classrooms to present the opportunity, and select and train the student to be the most effective board member possible. The nonprofit has had success with Library Boards in the past and would like to expand collaborations across the state.

Outcomes

  • At the end of the session, participants will understand the benefits of a student position.
  • At the end of the session, participants will understand the process of facilitating a student position.
  • At the end of the session, participants will understand what a collaboration with Government for Tomorrow entails.

Speaker

Liam DreyerLiam Dreyer
Government for Tomorrow

Liam Dreyer is a Charlevoix high schooler and founder of the nonprofit, Government for Tomorrow. He became one of the youngest Downtown Development Authority board members in the country at 14 years old. After realizing how unique his position was, he founded the organization to give his peers the same opportunity.

 

 

 

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Thursday | 3:00 – 4:00 PM

Want to Host a Social Work Field Student? Here's How!

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience: Great for academics

Public library budgets often prevent the administration from hiring social workers. A cost-effective solution to this problem is to enlist a social work field student to join the library staff. Using the presenter's research and current literature on the topic, this session will discuss the "how-to's" of public libraries collaborating with a college or university to host a social work field student. Areas of discussion include: (1) how to start the process; (2) tasks that students can assume in their role as field students; (3) supervision arrangements; (4) how to get buy-in from library staff; (5) communication with the college/university; and (6) potential barriers and solutions to those barriers. Zettervall and Nienow (2019) contend that social work field students placed in libraries can provide a wealth of benefits. Besides being a cost-effective measure to serve the increasing demands of consumers, it is a way for public libraries to test out the need for a full-time social worker on staff.

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to articulate the advantages of having social work field students in public libraries.
  • Participants will be able to identify the potential barriers that might present when social work students join public library staff.
  • Participants will critically discern the viability of implementing this model in their own library systems. 

Speaker

Mark GieslerMark Giesler
Saginaw Valley State University

Mark A. Giesler, PhD, LMSW, is Professor of Social Work at Saginaw Valley State University. His research agenda includes qualitative studies of marginalized groups. More recently, he has studied the intersection of public libraries and social work. He currently is an Assistant Editor for the Journal of Ethnographic and Qualitative Research. In addition to his work in academia, he works part-time as a therapist for Butterfly Counseling in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

 

 

SEL Using Makerspaces and Passion Projects in Libraries

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Social-Emotional Learning Using Makerspaces and Passion Projects in Schools and Libraries will demonstrate successful step-by-step projects that can be used in library programming for students in grades 3-6. Each project is connected to CASEL's SEL framework. Learn how to connect your programs to help kids develop the SEL skills they need for success. Based on Julie Darling's book Social-Emotional Learning Using Makerspaces and Passion Projects. 

Outcomes

  • Participants will leave with step-by-step maker programming ideas
  • Participants will learn about how to connect these with CASEL'S SEL framework.
  • Participants will get ideas for free tools to use to foster SEL.

Speaker

Julie DarlingJulie Darling
Ann Arbor Public Schools

Julie is the author of Social-Emotional Learning using Makerspaces and Passion Projects. She's been working with kids in schools and libraries for 18 years. Julie has an MSI in library information services, a BA in psychology and a teaching certification from the University of Michigan. You can follow her on her website growingmakerspace.com.

 

 

Beyond Books: Bringing Innovative Items to Your Library

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Can you imagine being able to check out a telescope from your library? What about a cake pan shaped like Wonder Woman or Nintendo Switch or sewing machine? Well, it's happening all over the country as libraries are adding their own versions of ‘library of things’ to their collections. This session will dive into the culture of libraries of things and follow one library's journey in setting up its first ‘Innovative Items Collection’. We would follow the Rochester Hills Public Library's journey of starting from scratch writing their new collection development and lending policy for this new collection, researching new reservation software, ordering and processing items beyond books, and assessing collection needs and patron reactions. Journey with us as we explore our ups and downs, mistakes, and high notes in bringing items beyond books to our library.

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to identify key benefits a collection like this could have on their library.
  • Participants will be able to identify specific needs in their community this collection could help fulfill.
  • Participants will be able to sketch out a draft road map to how they might start their own collection beyond books.

Speaker

Tierney CzartoskiTierney Czartoski
Rochester Hills Public Library

Tierney started her career as a middle school science educator. Now she is able to share her love of science and technology with the community through the Makerspace at the library. Tierney has enjoyed 3 years of educating and assisting patrons to learn in different ways through the Makerspace. There she coordinates over 45 pieces of equipment in the makerspace for patrons to use. Her latest undertaking is starting an “Innovative Items Collection” where patrons can check out items "beyond books".

 

 

Strategic Planning for Community Impact

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

Does your library need a new strategic plan? This session is for you! Learn how to guide your library through a strategic planning process that will result in a clear, focused plan to serve as your roadmap for increased community engagement and impact. We'll talk about each phase of the process, how to involve the community, and the role of board and staff members. Plus, you'll get tips for implementing your strategic plan so it doesn't end up on a shelf. 

Outcomes

  • Participants will understand why having a strategic plan is critical for focusing energy and efforts.
  • Participants will have the tools to design a strategic planning process that is right for their library.
  • Participants will understand how to transition from strategic planning to implementation and how to measure success.

Speaker

Amanda StanderferAmanda Standerfer
Fast Forward Libraries

Amanda Standerfer’s passion is helping libraries advance so they can create meaningful impact in their communities. Amanda has 15 years of experience at various positions in public libraries. She also has 7 years of experience working in the philanthropy sector. She has a BA and MA in History from Eastern Illinois University and a MLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

 

Bridge and Conquer: Promotion Change in LIS Education

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for students, great for academics

This panel presentation by faculty of the School of Information Sciences (SIS) at Wayne State University explores ways in which they bridge divides between information professionals, faculty, students, institutions, and very diverse populations. A highlight of the session will be the work of SIS students who have creatively addressed information-related problems that create bridges to varied communities. The session will be visual and interactive, with a special invitation for input from attendees regarding the state of higher education in our field. 

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to articulate four ways in which research connects with the real world of libraries and other information settings.
  • Participants will be able to describe ways in which applied research can improve the lives of their libraries' communities.
  • Participants will be able to better understand ways in which higher education in our field can forge connections between our field and the communities we serve. 

Speakers

Tom WalkerTom Walker
Wayne State University, School of Information Sciences

Tom Walker has an MA in Library and Information Science from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in Information Studies from the University of Illinois. He has worked as a librarian in academic, public, and special libraries and has spent many years as an educator and administrator. His areas of specialty have included library history, knowledge organization, and research methods.

 

 

Hermina AnghelescuHermina Anghelescu
Wayne State University, School of Information Sciences

Prof. Anghelescu has an MLIS and Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from the University of Texas at Austin. She has many years of experience as a practitioner, faculty member, and editor and board member of several scholarly journals. With international interests in libraries, library associations, and library education spanning several continents, she is a leader in international LIS research and associations.

 

 

Timothy BowmanTimothy Bowman
Wayne State University, School of Information Sciences

Prof. Bowman has a Ph.D. in Information Science from the School of Informatics and Computing and an M.I.S. from the School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Bloomington. His academic interests span a range of information science topics, including social media, altmetrics, scholarly communication, open science, and digital humanities.

 

 

Bin LiBin Li
Wayne State University, School of Information Sciences

Dr. Bin Li received a Ph.D. and taught as a teaching fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She currently teaches courses in the information science area at WSU, including Human Information Behavior, Database Management and Design, and Information Technology. She does research on social aspects of technology implementation and information seeking.

 

 

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Friday | 9:00 – 10:00 AM

The First Amendment: A Library Puzzle

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees, great for small and rural libraries

Public libraries have a special relationship with the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. However, it is not always clear or easy to understand exactly how this relationship can affect library operations and policy. This presentation uses a fictional library and an interactive format to identify and discuss common library policies and occurrences that could trigger First Amendment problems. Participants are encouraged - but not required - to play along.

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to evaluate their library's policies and procedures for certain First Amendment Issues.
  • Participants will be able to utilize program discussion and resources to formulate First Amendment-informed policies and procedures.
  • Participants will be able to identify solutions to certain First Amendment issues.

Speakers

Clare MembielaClare Membiela
Library of Michigan

As the Library Law Consultant at the Library of Michigan, Clare helps public libraries understand and manage legal issues that impact library services. Before joining the Library of Michigan, Clare was the Associate Director for the WMU Cooley Law School Libraries. She has an M.L.S. from Southern Connecticut State University, a J.D. from the University of Miami, and 30 years of law library experience.

 

 

#LibraryTikTok: Use TikTok to Create Magical Connections

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

TikTok is more than a popular social media platform. It is a playground to promote library services, programs, books, and everything libraries while connecting with a wider audience and demographic. Learn from the Fowlerville Library TikTok account, which has gone viral multiple times. They are known for their successful "One Star Review Guess Who" series, inclusive recommendations, and quirky library life. Through visual screenshots, videos, and demonstrations, they will discuss different aspects of video creation, share behind-the-scenes set-up, amazing impacts and connections they've had with patrons, arguments that support libraries using TikTok and more! TikTok brings libraries into the modern era of communication and social media, but it's also an opportunity to debunk the Hollywood stereotype of library life and show the world just how awesome libraries are!

Outcomes

  • Participants will identify ways libraries can use TikTok to communicate with the public.
  • Participants will apply TikTok trends, videos, and strategies to library marketing techniques.
  • Participants will analyze what makes a library TikTok video successful and meaningful.

Speakers

Storm KopitschStorm Kopitsch
Fowlerville District Library

Storm Kopitsch is the Youth Services Librarian and TikTok Guru at the Fowlerville District Library. Prior to working at FDL, she worked at the Capital Area District Libraries and has been working in libraries for over 10 years. When she's not at the library, you may find her hanging upside-down from aerial silks, reading rainbow novels, knitting, or acting in local theatre productions.

 

 

Zoe GuettlerZoe Guettler
Fowlerville District Library

Zoe Guettler is the "yes, and" gal behind the Fowlerville District Library TikTok account. She previously presented at the Michigan Library Association Spring Institute in March of 2022 on the topic, and would like to continue to help libraries navigate the new and daunting social media platform. The FDL TikTok account has reached over 85k followers and has gone viral multiple times - most notably from the "One Star Review Guess Who" series. The FDL TikTok has also been featured in local newspapers for its success.

 

 

Staff Challenge: Interactive Onboarding Using Beanstack

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Onboarding is an essential part of new employee success and it allows organizations to purposefully build a team-centered culture where everyone has an understanding of the structure, mission, and vision. Yet, many organizations struggle to make their employee onboarding experience more than just about processes and paperwork. This presentation will describe how to use Beanstack, software many libraries already have to host reading challenges for patrons, as an innovative onboarding tool. Learn how library managers can create structured training processes with opportunities to highlight expectations about organizational values like teamwork, service, inclusion and more. New staff can enjoy a self-paced experience that gives them needed information in an organized way and that allows them to refer back over time.

Outcomes

  • Understand how onboarding is more than staff training on policies and procedures.
  • Identify how onboarding can impact the culture of their organization.
  • See Beanstack, and potentially other tools, as options to create a more engaging onboarding experience.

Speaker

Keegan SuleckiKeegan Sulecki
Troy Public Library

Keegan Sulecki, Head of Youth Services at the Troy Public Library, holds an MLIS from Wayne State University and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Michigan. Sulecki was inspired to work in libraries as a teenager enjoying programming at her local library and her first job was as a library page. Sulecki has also worked at the Clarkston Independence District Library and the Chelsea District Library.

 

 

Taking on Literacy... Literally!

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future.

Recommended Audience: Great for small and rural libraries

Bellaire Public Library is taking on the important task of helping families improve their literacy skills in reading and information. Three programs at BPL - "Just Read!" for school-age children, "Prescription to Read" for teens and adults, and "A Family Literacy Program" each address specific literacy needs in our community. Session participants will learn about each of these programs, and how they are organized, promoted, and funded. Suggestions on how to implement similar programs for all class sizes of libraries will be discussed. Participants will also leave with a kit of materials to help them create similar literacy programs at their own libraries.

Outcomes

  • Participants will understand the basic concepts of reading and information literacy and how these concepts affect communities.
  • Participants will be able to implement similar programs at their own library.
  • Participants will leave with a packet of information including sign up sheets, promotional materials, resources, and timelines to help create similar programs

Speaker

Cindi PlaceCindi Place
Bellaire Public Library

Cindi is a former school media specialist who moved into the public library realm in 2016. She earned her MLIS degree from Wayne State University in 2020 and began her public library career as an adult, reference, and technology librarian at Boyne District Library. In 2020 she became the director at Bellaire Public Library (BPL). In October 2021, BPL was named the State Librarian's Excellence Award winner and strives every day to live up to that incredible honor.

 

 

Two-Part Mini Sessions: Winter Reading-Flamingos in the Snow! and Dramatic Play in Your Library

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for everyone

Learn about some exciting programs at the Peter White Public Library during this 2-part mini-session presentation. 

9:00 – 9:30 AM: Winter Reading-Flamingos in the Snow! 

Flamingos in the Upper Peninsula? Must be the Peter White Public Library's Winter Reading program! In the fall and winter of 2021, the PWPL was still operating under COVID-19 restrictions, working hard to connect with the youth of the community and encourage them to keep reading. The PWPL Youth Services Librarian saw a post on social media from a different library that was using yard flamingos during their summer reading program and thought " Flamingos in the Snow" for a winter reading program! After a successful 2021 program that saw more 400 yard-flamingos around town, PWPL has expanded the winter reading program and gone miniature-with more than 4,500 hours of reading logged as kids read to earn new miniature items for their habitats. PWPL also added a Teen Winter Reading program, with teens reading for the chance to win a gift card in 2022. An easy, fun, and highly motivating program, and an amazing way to engage kids with reading during the long winter months.

9:30 – 10:00 AM: Dramatic Play in Your Library

A Dramatic Play center can be of great value to your library's families! Dramatic Play centers are an easy thing to create, with huge benefits for children and caregivers for comparatively small effort and time required by staff. Construed of free play with a set theme, children show their adults how to play and how to interact with them. A Dramatic Play center is also fantastic for children playing with each other-learning how to cooperatively play, set rules for play, and more.

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to create a dramatic play station at their library no matter the budget or space constraints.
  • Participants will take home a list of ideas for dramatic station themes that they will have contributed to during the session.
  • Participants will understand the value of a dramatic play station for bonding children and adults together around the act of playing.

Speaker

Sarah RehborgSarah Rehborg 
Peter White Public Library

Sarah Rehborg has worked at libraries since she was 15 years old (and has known she was going to be a librarian since she was 13). Graduating in 2013 with her MLIS from UW-Madison, Sarah jumped into her first professional career as the Youth Services Librarian at the Peter White Public Library in Marquette MI on the beautiful Lake Superior (quite literally, ask her about the time she hauled buckets of water out of that lake!). Sarah is passionate about programs to bring children into PWPL.

 

 

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Friday | 10:15 – 11:15 AM

The National Labor Relations Board – Protecting Employee Rights

Track: Reimagine - Sessions focus on how libraries are rethinking and adapting services and programs to the changing needs of staff, patrons, and/or the community.

Recommended Audience: Great for students

The NLRB is an independent federal agency that aims to increase awareness about the rights afforded to employees through the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), best practices for employers to maintain and uphold their employees’ rights, and the services that the NLRB offers. Through outreach and education, the NLRB can extend its reach to all those who seek out libraries and librarians as information resources. Region 7 of the NLRB is committed to serving all who live in Michigan. 

Outcomes

  • Know how the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) can assist employees.
  • Be able to refer Library Patrons to the NLRB website, flyer, brochure, or phone number for labor relations questions or concerns
  • Have at least one point of contact within the Region-7 office of the NLRB.

Speaker

Elizabeth KerwinElizabeth Kerwin
National Labor Relations Board

Ms. Kerwin works tirelessly to enforce the statute and educate the public about rights and obligations under the National Labor Relations Act. A native of Loda, Illinois, she has a degree in Business Administration and a Master of Human Resources and Industrial Relations from the University of Illinois. Ms. Kerwin began her career with the Agency as a Student Assistant Field Examiner Co-Op in Region 29–Brooklyn before being hired as a Field Examiner in Region 7. She was promoted to Supervisory Examiner in 2014 and to her prior position as Assistant to the Regional Director in 2016.  Ms. Kerwin has extensive experience in speaking to groups of all sizes and backgrounds about the mission of the National Labor Relations Board, including a recent Facebook Livestream with Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib and Congressman Andy Levin.

 

Sensory Accessibility and Inclusion: KultureCity

Track: Connect - Sessions focus on services and programs that engage staff, patrons, and/or the community with the goal of improving library services.

Recommended Audience: Great for Everyone

Sensory inclusion has become one of the most important and most often overlooked aspects of public service. Whether the individual has Autism, PTSD, Dementia, or Down Syndrome, they deserve to be welcomed and accommodated at public libraries in particular. And while the Clarkston Independence District Library has been an Autism-friendly environment for years, it was time to take things to the next level with KultureCity.

But what is KultureCity exactly? KultureCity is the nation’s leading sensory inclusion non-profit. Its purpose is to help institutions such as libraries not only create a welcoming space but also provide actual materials designed to help them when things become overwhelming. This session will describe the KultureCity process as well as how CIDL tailored its program for our own specific community needs in the hope that those who have not yet encountered this program and company will give it serious consideration. 

Outcomes

  • Participants will have learned that sensory inclusion is more important than most people realize.
  • Participants will have learned that individuals with sensory needs fall under several categories.
  • Participants will have learned that accommodation goes beyond mere acknowledgment.

Speakers

Stacia SerafinStacia Serafin
Clarkston Independence District Library

Stacia Serafin enjoys working with all ages, 0 - adult, and currently works at two libraries fulfilling her dream of serving the public. She believes the library is a safe space and should be your home away from home with books being your friends and librarians as your guide. She loves to make patrons feel safe and welcome at any library from hosting storytimes to training staff on how to be ready for anything that might come up in daily library occurrences.

 

 

Chris NadeauChris Nadeau
Clarkston Independence District Library

Chris Nadeau has worked in every aspect of non-librarian library work from volunteer to Circulation Manager. He is also a published author of two novels and over three dozen short stories. He has worked for four different libraries, three of which have incorporated KultureCity into their cultures. He has been the force behind bringing it to the Clarkston Independence District Library.

 

 

Intellectual Freedom Panel

Track: Create - Sessions focus on concepts, programs, or services new to libraries and/or what’s trending for the future. 

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees

COMING SOON

Outcomes

COMING SOON

Speakers

COMING SOON

 

Library Law Q & A with Anne and Clare

Track: Lead - Sessions focus on how library staff, patrons, and/or community can lead others towards inspiring solutions.

Recommended Audience: Great for trustees, great for small and rural libraries

A Q&A session centering on legal questions concerning the library community. Anne Seurynck, an attorney with Foster, Swift Collins and Smith, and Clare Membiela, Library of Michigan Library Law Consultant will field questions from session attendees on a variety of library law topics. Any legal information will be solely for informational and discussion purposes and is not to be considered legal advice. 

Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to identify the legal concepts behind certain library legal issues.
  • Participants will be able to determine whether their library is in compliance with certain legal requirements.
  • Participants will discover resources available to address some library legal issues.

Speakers

Clare MembielaClare Membiela
Library of Michigan

As the Library Law Consultant at the Library of Michigan, Clare helps public libraries understand and manage legal issues that impact library services. Before joining the Library of Michigan, Clare was the Associate Director for the WMU Cooley Law School Libraries. She has an M.L.S. from Southern Connecticut State University, a J.D. from the University of Miami, and 30 years of law library experience.

 

 

Anne SeurynckAnne Seurynck
Foster, Swift Collins and Smith

Anne is a shareholder and President of the Foster Swift Law Firm. Her focus has been on the representation of libraries. Anne counsels clients on policies, library privacy concerns, constitutional law questions, millage and funding issues, patron problems and other issues affecting public libraries.

 


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