Text logo that says MLA 2021 Virtual Annual Conference Connect to the future

 MLA 2021 VIRTUAL HOME  |  REGISTRATION RATES  |  SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE  |  FEATURED SPEAKERS  |  EDUCATION SESSIONS  |  VENDOR AND SPONSOR OPPORTUNITIES  |  MLA ANNUAL CONFERENCE HISTORY  |  MLA 2020 VIRTUAL CONFERENCE ARCHIVES  


MLA 2021 VIRTUAL CONFERENCE EDUCATION SESSIONS

*Schedule is subject to change

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM  |  1:00 – 2:00 PM  |  2:10 – 2:55 PM

Thursday, October 14, 2020

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM  |  1:00 – 2:00 PM  |  2:10 – 2:55 PM


 

 


Wednesday | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Wednesday Sessions Sponsored by Library Design Associates, Inc.

Impact Programming: Systems Change (Expungement and Adult Literacy)

Track: Connect

Would you like your library to help make lasting changes in your community but don't know where to start? Jackson District Library offers a case study on systems change, and how they created two services intended to impact people for the rest of their lives; the adult literacy service they started in 2019, and the expungement help service that they launched in 2020 ahead of the 2021 Clean Slate legislation. Systems change is an intentional process designed to alter the status quo. Learn how they worked with community partners to launch these services, the cost and funding of the services, and how it impacted the patronage of the library.  

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand systems change.
  2. identify community partners to help with systems change.
  3. learn how systems change can reduce barriers to library service.

Presenters:

Calvin Battles, Jackson District Library

Becca Hruscik, Jackson District Library

Library Law Q&A

Track: Lead

Like any public entity, public libraries have multiple legal considerations. But toss in the additional constitutional and establishment issues, and you have one unique legal environment. Join a practicing Library Law Attorney and a Law Librarian turned Library Law Consultant for a casual Q&A session where participants will determine the topics of discussion and where everyone will learn that pretty much every library has (legal) issues, and every legal issue has (some kind of) a resolution.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand solutions to certain legal situations that occur in libraries.
  2. identify certain legal issues occurring in their libraries.
  3. apply the information provided to legal issues they are experiencing in their libraries.

Presenters:

Clare Membiela, Library of Michigan

Anne Seurynck, Foster, Swift, Collins and Smith Law Firm

Reconsidering the Seed Library

Track: Connect

Gardening has seen a remarkable resurgence in popularity since the beginning of 2020. Libraries are uniquely positioned to help both new and experienced gardeners alike, and Michigan has 96 libraries listed on the Michigan Seed Library Network website, more than any other state. Whether you are considering creating a seed library or are looking to take your existing library to the next level, this session will help you reconsider your seed library as a holistic initiative supported by programming, collection development, publicity, and staff training. You’ll learn about the new One Seed, One State initiative, and how to receive a free kit with seed packets, seeds, and promotional materials.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand the relevance of seed libraries to our communities.
  2. know the basics of starting a seed library and know how to access information and support from the Michigan Seed Library Network.
  3. be motivated to participate in 2022’s One Seed, One State initiative.

Presenters:

Pam Quackenbush, Lyon Township Public Library & Michigan Seed Library Network

Bevin Cohen, Small House Farm & Michigan Seed Library Network

Transitioning and Sustaining Community Connection for Newly Employed Library Workers during COVID

Track: Reimagine

Entering a higher education institution as a new library employee often means identifying your role, allies, and methods to reach the community served. Identifying and reaching out becomes even more challenging when employee attrition results in a large loss of institutional knowledge. When the COVID-19 pandemic forced an academic library to shut down physical services, traditional means of establishing relationships with the community were further complicated. This case study explores this library's successes and failures in reaching out to a community during the high-stress, remote teaching and learning situation.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. identify synchronous library events that build relationships with their library's community.
  2. create communication practices to replicate at their libraries during times of crisis.
  3. appraise faculty, staff and students' changing informational needs in times of crisis.

Presenter:

Kathy Ladell, University of Cincinnati Clermont College

Catch Me When My Millage Falls: A Proposal to Reform the Headlee Amendment and Proposal A to Stabilize Property Tax Revenues

Track: Lead

The main source of funding for the majority of Michigan libraries is from property taxes. Two state laws, the Headlee Amendment and Proposal A, have created budget constraints for libraries and municipalities by limiting tax revenues during times of economic growth, but have no floor on how much property valuations can fall for tax purposes during economic recessions. This has resulted in a significant loss of revenue, and the need for libraries and cities to have to go for “Headlee Override” millages or find other ways to address budget shortfalls. The Michigan Municipal League is leading a coalition of organizations in advocating for two simple fixes through a legislative change that would allow communities’ revenue to track with the state’s economy. Join us to learn more about the history and impact of Headlee and Proposal A, the plan to reform the law, and where libraries fit in!

At the end of the session, participants will…

  1. understand the Headlee Amendment
  2. understand Proposal A
  3. understand libraries’ role in reforming the laws

Presenters:

Jessica Keyser, Grosse Pointe Public Library

Ed Klobuchar, Hazel Park City Manager


Wednesday | 1:00 – 2:00 PM

Besides Book Clubs: When You Are in Charge of Programs

Track: Connect

Tired of storytimes, book clubs, and the standard library events? Spice up your programming calendar with unique activities and learn how to tailor to your community and build from your successes. But what makes a good program and where do your ideas come from? Who can you work with? For library staff just starting out to seasoned professionals who need to kick start their creativity, come break out of your box and join this interactive presentation.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. be able to approach people to be event presenters.
  2. learn methods to evaluate program participation.
  3. have five new resources for program development.

Presenter:

Amelia Yunker, Salem-South Lyon District Library

Bringing Battle Back: Virtual Battle of the Books and How It Changed Everything

Track: Reimagine

Battle of the Books has been a popular annual program of the Northville District Library for 15 years that draws in hundreds of patrons to participate and watch the event unfold each year. When NDL converted their Battle to an online format they brought in both old and new participants and changed the program for years to come. The NDL team will talk about planning, working with patrons to promote social distancing, dealing with technical and personnel hiccups, and looking towards the future. Participants will also gain access to the open-source scoring software specifically developed for both virtual and in-person Battle of the Books events.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. work with patrons and staff alike to approach a changed, but familiar program.
  2. take an established program to a virtual format, even when the technology doesn't exist.
  3. recognize opportunities to improve in-person programming.

Presenters:

Caryn Bartone, Northville District Library

Michael McEvoy, Northville District Library

Natalie Molnar, Northville District Library

Tyler Vitale, Northville District Library

Let Us Help Onboard Front-Line Staff with the MeL Maven Badge

Track: Create

The MeL Maven Badge alleviates your training stress by providing 6 self-paced courses to support your front-line staff in the areas of information literacy and MeL’s eResources. Courses use real-world reference situations like solving a Pinterest fail, providing research services to city officials, and homework help to provide your staff with a deep dive into the Top 10 MeL eResources. Learners who complete all six courses and successfully complete a quiz will earn their MeL Maven Badge!

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. list 3 ways in which the MeL Maven Badge reduces the training burden during onboarding.
  2. describe how to incorporate MeL Maven Badge completion into their learning culture.
  3. identify the information literacy and eResource competencies delivered through the MeL Maven Badge.

Presenters:

Liz Breed, Jackson District Library

Sonya Schryer Norris, Library of Michigan

Taking the Pulse: Strategic Planning During a Pandemic

Track: Lead

In the winter of 2020, the Canton Public Library was on the cusp of reevaluating its strategic plan when the COVID pandemic forced a pivot. The library reimagined what planning during uncertain times could be and developed a dynamic, focused approach to explore current specific community needs. Using design thinking, they developed a strategic process, which they titled, “Pulse”, to research, evaluate, prototype and implement short-term projects with an eye toward an understanding longer-term needs.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. learn how strategic planning can take place during uncertain times.
  2. apply the Pulse process for their own needs and projects.
  3. identify which projects and services could benefit from a Pulse project for your library.

Presenters:

Laura Fawcett, Canton Public Library

Laurie Golden, Canton Public Library

Korinna Kasara, Canton Public Library

Amy Lee, Canton Public Library

Michigan Penal Fines and Libraries

Track: Lead

Michigan is the only state to have constitutionally mandated funding for libraries through penal fines. Penal fines account for 3% to 70% of public libraries' annual budgets, and this funding source is an important priority for the MLA Advocacy and Legislative Committee. The collection and distribution of penal fines can be complicated to understand, join this session to learn more about the history of penal fines and the impact this unique funding source has on public libraries in various regions of the state. 

Presenters:

Thomas Boyd, State Court Administrator

Finance and Budgeting for Libraries

Track: Create

Sound financial management is the cornerstone of a healthy bottom line. With this session, you will increase your financial awareness from the professionals and learn how to implement these tools in the real world library setting.

At the end of the session, participants will…

  1. understand the basics of fund accounting.
  2. understand the budgeting process.
  3. see how to implement tools in your library

Presenter:

Brian Camiller, CPA, Plante Moran

 


Wednesday | 2:10 – 2:55 PM

Because They're Worth It: Building a Sustainable Staff Training Program 

Track: Reimagine

Hear how the Capital Area District Libraries tackled an intricate training program that addressed need-to-know information for new hires, ongoing goals pertaining to specific positions, and professional focus areas such as technology, circulation, services and readers advisory. We'll look at tools they use such as monthly exercises, workshop series, and outcome measurements, in addition to how they continue to improve their program.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. know different options for developing staff training and professional development programs that benefit both staff and public service.
  2. see potential pitfalls that should be avoided in developing staff training programs.
  3. participate in discussion and practical resource-sharing about staff training ideas and outcomes.

Presenters:

Jolee Hamlin, Capital Area District Libraries

Julie Laxton, Capital Area District Libraries

Courtney Tang, Capital Area District Libraries

Creating Community Connections for School Readiness

Track: Connect

Parents can help kids build school readiness skills in restaurants, parks, stores...anyplace families go. How do you connect with non-library users to get the word out? Through community partnerships! Learn how we used community partners to let parents know about TALK: Text and Learn for Kindergarten, now available across Michigan. Get tips and tools to partner with doctors, government agencies, and businesses to connect parents to the library and be an early literacy leader in your community.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. reflect on potential community partners in their district and use a list of best practices to establish partnerships that improve school readiness.
  2. understand how to use provided tools, such as MOUs, presentations, and letters of introduction, to build and sustain strong community partnerships.
  3. use data and provided templates to create reports to show partners the impact of their contribution.

Presenters:

Lisa Hoenig, Ypsilanti District Library

Jodi Krahnke, Ypsilanti District Library

Jaroslava Pallas-Brink, Ypsilanti District Library

Like, Share, and Subscribe to Reaching Your Audience with a Podcast!

Track: Create

Even before the pandemic, many libraries were experiencing a decrease in visits. Librarians need to take not only their programs/services but also their knowledge and materials to the people! Podcasts have become one of the best ways to reach an audience. The cost of equipment has become less expensive and easier to use. Many patrons listen to podcasts to learn, which aligns with most library strategic goals. Also, a good podcast entertains and encourages patrons to visit the library!  Participants will learn about the best podcast practices, equipment, and how to publish. We guarantee you will be entertained!

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. learn the best equipment and software to create a podcast.
  2. understand how to best craft a podcast format that is right for their library audience.
  3. learn how to best edit and promote a podcast.

Presenters:

Sandra Farag, Kalamazoo Public Library

Kevin King, Kalamazoo Public Library

Jarrod Wilson, Kalamazoo Public Library

Libraries Build Business

Track: Lead

Learn information about ALA’s Libraries Build Business initiative from the project’s manager and a sample of participating libraries.

At the end of the session, participants will…

  1. Learn the goals of Libraries Build Business
  2. Understand the challenges faced during the project
  3. Hear the project outcomes from participating libraries

Presenters:

Megan Janicki, Libraries Build Business, ALA

Brandon West, Independence Public Library, Independence, KS

Chris Bourret, Providence Public Library, Providence, RI

MLA AMA

Track: Connect

mmm...Llama!? Actually, it's "Michigan Library Association: Ask Me Anything!"

The audience leads the agenda during this session featuring MLA Leadership. We’re here to answer your questions about getting involved with MLA workgroups and committees, legislative priorities, becoming better library advocates, our mission or 2022 plans, how we’re changing post-pandemic, and everything in-between. 

Presenters:

Debbie Mikula, MLA Executive Director

Kelly Richards, MLA President

Bob Devries, MLA Lobbyist

 



Wednesday | 3:00 – 3:55 PM 

The CryptoLibrary: NFTs, Copyright, and the Future of Intellectual Property on the Blockchain

Track: Create

This session aims to give participants an introduction to the latest innovation from the world of cryptocurrencies- non-fungible tokens, or NFTs. NFTs allow digital assets to be minted as unique items that can be verified and traced back to their original provenance. This will make the impossible possible and revolutionize all aspects of our lives- finance, art, entertainment, education, etc. Come to the CryptoLibrary to see the future of the blockchain.

At the end of the session, participants will…

  1. be able to identify a non-fungible token
  2. understand how NFTs can be used for art, publishing, music, video games, real estate, etc.
  3. know current copyright standards, their effect on NFTs, and how they will affect libraries and education

Presenters:

Patrick Mullane, Baker College

Going Forward from the Pandemic: Libraries’ Role in Economic Recovery

Track: Create

As drivers of local innovation and job creation, entrepreneurs and small businesses must have deep support in order to help communities recover and move forward from the pandemic. Public libraries have an essential part to play in strengthening the local support network for entrepreneurs and small businesses, particularly for professionals from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. Urban Libraries Council members united in 2020 to launch an action team focused on identifying immediate ways that all libraries can better support entrepreneurs and small businesses in the post-pandemic world. Working together, this team helped to launch ULC's Closing the Entrepreneurship Gap Toolkit, which provides a framework to advance libraries of any size and strengthen their role as an entrepreneurial and small business hub. In this session, leaders from this team will discuss how they have innovated and stepped beyond in-person programming to address key challenges in their work to support local businesses and entrepreneurs, including narrowing digital and physical access barriers. Team members will also share general strategies and action steps to help attendees apply an equity lens in order to advance economic recovery in their own communities.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. be able to recognize the essential role of public libraries in supporting underrepresented entrepreneurs and business owners.
  2. be able to think about potential programming and service methods to serve entrepreneurs and business owners in a virtual and hybrid environment.
  3. be equipped to take steps to expand their library’s small business and entrepreneurship services and capacity.

Presenters:

Betsey Suchanic, Urban Libraries Council

Connect to the Future of PBS Books

Track: Connect

PBS Books is helping libraries nationwide connect with their communities. Learn how PBS Books developed the numerous free resources available (book lists, programs, author talk videos for adults and kids, and more), explore our EDI content and ways to use it, and see strategies to connect with your PBS local station. Plus, brainstorm about how PBS Books can help you connect to the future and how your library might want to get more involved with PBS Books.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. be aware and understand how to utilize PBS Books resources.
  2. learn strategies to better connect with your local PBS station.
  3. explore PBS’s EDI content.

Presenters:

Heather-Marie Montilla, PBS Books 

Rediscovering Outreach: Moving through COVID and Beyond

Track: Connect

Different patron groups require different approaches to outreach. In this presentation, attendees will hear from librarians working with K-12 students, senior citizens, and other community-based groups. Presenters will give an overview of how their outreach strategies evolved, and how COVID-19 necessitated different ways of connecting. Presenters will share what they plan to keep as part of their outreach repertoire, and where they hope to take their outreach programs in the future.

At the end of the session, participants will...:

  1. identify different groups for targeted outreach
  2. have strategies to reach people even when library buildings are closed
  3. have ideas of where to take their outreach efforts in the future

Presenters:

Angelo Moreno, East Lansing Public Library

Meghan Mott, Clinton-Macomb Public Library

Brittany Wesner, Clinton-Macomb Public Library

 


Thursday | 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Thursday Sessions Sponsored by Biblionix 

A Core Collection: Welcoming New and Casual Library Users 

Track: Reimagine

The session introduces Kent District Library's new CORE collection, newly purchased and specially branded copies of our one hundred most loved adult titles. This collection represents the intersection of well-reviewed books and popular books as determined by KDL circulation statistics. As a subset of the general collection, the titles are at least six months old and answer a common request received from casual library users. "Can you give me a good book to read?"

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. gain techniques for choosing, maintaining, and evaluating a library's "core" collection.
  2. evaluate the benefits of a branded subcollection of library titles.
  3. take a new approach to reader's advisory.

Presenter:

Penni Speets-Zurgable, Kent District Library

Grants for Programs - Writing and Managing a Grant Budget

Track: Connect

Helping your community is at the heart of library service. But how do you fund a needed program? Grants are an option but getting one may not be easy. Many grant applications do not get approved because the budget is not appropriate for the project. For libraries that receive a grant, managing the grant funds can also be difficult. Come learn about writing budgets for grant applications and managing funds for grants. Be prepared to make the most of funding opportunities for your library.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand what a complete grant budget includes.
  2. be able to manage grant funds correctly.
  3. be more prepared to apply for grant funding.

Presenter:

Karren Reish, Library of Michigan

In Small Bites: Making Diversity and Inclusion Audits Manageable

Track: Reimagine

This session will look at the ways Capital Area District Libraries decided to measure diversity and inclusion in library collections in small bites. By approaching it through multiple smaller efforts in programming, readers advisory products, and collection reviews, the district has brought attention to the strengths and weaknesses of our collections and practices.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand what a diversity audit is and why it may be helpful.
  2. have a selection of smaller steps one might add to their library culture to encourage DEI in collections and public services.
  3. be able to include specific collection-related DEI Outcomes, Goals and Strategies in a strategic plan.

Presenters:

Mari Garza, Capital Area District Libraries

Cheryl Lindemann, Capital Area District Libraries

Thais Rousseau, Capital Area District Libraries

Jessica Trotter, Capital Area District Libraries

No Pictures Please! First Amendment Audits: How Libraries can Prepare

Track: Lead

Michigan libraries are the latest group to be in the viewfinder of "First Amendment Auditors" looking to garner attention and embarrass public officials on social media. These "audits" can be stressful and traumatic for staff and patrons who witness them. What should a library think about when considering policies and procedures related to First Amendment Audits? A practicing Library Law Attorney and a Law Librarian turned Library Law Consultant provide a "snapshot" history of First Amendment Audits and focus on how libraries can prepare for and mitigate an audit.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. be able to describe the purpose of a First Amendment Audit and what it entails.
  2. be able to identify characteristics and cultural aspects of their library that may affect their First Amendment Audit policies.
  3. learn possible options in creating their First Amendment Audit policies.

Presenters:

Clare Membiela, Library of Michigan

Anne Seurynck, Foster Swift, Collins and Smith Law Firm

Transforming Teen Services

Track: Create

Transforming Teen Services is a nationwide initiative of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association. Transforming Teen Services aims to support and elevate teen services in libraries and other learning environments by integrating connected learning, computational thinking, and youth development to help build responsive services for and with teens.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. have an understanding of the practices of connected learning and computational thinking.
  2. learn the importance of applying these practices to teen programming.
  3. have the tools to begin to implement these practices and transform teen services.

Presenters:

Lindsay Gojcaj, Novi Public Library

Amanda Heidema, Herrick District Library

Cathy Lancaster, Library of Michigan

Library Friends and the Academic Library

Track: Connect

Hear about how one academic library has been supported over the years by their Friends group. Get ideas on how a Friends of the Library organization can help support spaces, collections and programs at your academic library. Be inspired by suggestions for fundraisers and friendraisers and more. Learn how a Friends group can bring people together across campus with a shared love for the library. You'll leave this session brimming with ideas and enthusiasm!

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. Be able to identify ways a Friends group can support an academic library.
  2. Have an understanding of how to start a Friends group on their campus.
  3. Learn different types of fundraising and friendraising that can be successful on a college or university campus.

Presenters:

Jill Sodt, Mott Community College

 


Thursday | 1:00 – 2:00 PM

Everyone's Included! iPad & Chromebook Lending

Track: Reimagine

In 2020, CADL added iPads and Chromebooks to their Library of Things collection to address the desperate need for digital inclusion that the pandemic highlighted. The 35 iPad Kits and 34 Chromebook Kits circulate with hotspots for internet access. Come learn how we did it from selection, purchasing, set-up, circulating, maintaining, and managing. Hear lessons learned and how to expand digital inclusion efforts in your own community.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand how to research, implement, and circulate digital devices to their community.
  2. learn how to locate relevant statistics to address digital inclusion.
  3. know how to address library privacy concerns pertaining to lending digital devices.

Presenter(s):

Jessica Goodrich, Capital Area District Libraries

Jonathan Nobach, Capital Area District Libraries

Using MeL Connections for Adult Programming

Track: Connect

Get to know MeL Connections for Adult Programming, a guide to using MeL eResources to support virtual and in-person programming. Attendees will explore the benefits of using eResources to design and implement a wide range of "How to MeL" programs and develop a draft plan using the template provided within the guide.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. identify the benefits of using MeL eResources to plan and carry out library programming.
  2. generate ideas for programming that would be supported by MeL eResources.
  3. analyze the content of an eResource to determine how it can be used to develop a program.

Presenter:

Laura Warren-Gross, Midwest Collaborative for Library Services (MCLS)

Welcoming Everyone: Creating Equitable, and Inclusive Library Policies

Track: Create

Public libraries must constantly adopt and manage policies, and crafting legal policies means wrestling with multiple considerations. Should these considerations include the impact on specific communities such as immigrants, BIPOC, LBGTQ+, the elderly, and the disabled? How should the needs of these populations determine amendments or shifts in policy? This session will look at library policies through the lens of minorities, particularly the BIPOC community and provide some policy drafting tips and suggestions for libraries striving to connect and serve.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. describe solutions to some legal situations that occur in libraries.
  2. identify legal issues occurring in their libraries.
  3. apply information provided to legal issues they are experiencing.

Presenters:

Clare Membiela, Library of Michigan

Tara Michener, Library Trustee

So You Want to Be a Library Director? Part 1

Track: Lead

The library director is an essential position. The director sets the tone for the organization, shapes its culture, influences its hiring decisions, and works with the governing body, staff and community to chart a mission, vision and goals for the library. It is an exciting and rewarding job, yet finding good candidates for open positions is becoming more and more challenging, as library workers shy away from moving into administration. Without good library directors, what happens to the future of libraries?

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand what the job of library director encompasses.
  2. have reasons to consider becoming a library director.
  3. understand how to prepare themselves to be library directors.

Presenter:

Cathy Russ, West Bloomfield Township Library

Remote Work Renaissance 

Track: Lead

Well, we got through that pandemic, and some people still want to work remotely - now what? Let's spend some time exploring a number of best practices that employers are using to ensure remote work is mutually beneficial; from topics of efficiency, to the technology being used, to the impact on culture, and considerations for library policies. The year 2020 prompted a renaissance in how and where work can be performed. Let's consider the lessons learned as we plan for the future.

At the end of the session, participants will…

  1. Understand how various employment laws impact remote work
  2. Recognize the benefits and challenges of having people working remotely through real examples
  3. Learn what other businesses and industries are doing to make the most of remote work.

Presenter:

Brian Mortimore, Kent District Library

It Ain’t Easy Being Green Design

Track: Reimagine

When planning and budgeting for capital improvement projects, consider making meaningful investments in sustainable design such as living roofs or walls and cutting-edge energy-efficient systems. Join architect Seth Penchansky for a discussion of sustainable design concepts and examples from local public buildings. 

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. See examples of green design in Michigan libraries
  2. Understand the benefits of investing in sustainable infrastructure
  3. Be inspired to bring sustainable design to their libraries

Presenters:

Seth Penchansky, Daniels and Zermack Architects 

 


Thursday | 2:10 – 2:55 PM

Mastering Virtual Programming

Track: Reimagine

One day the masks will go away, but virtual programming is here to stay. In this interactive, fast-paced session, Martina Mathisen, a communication skills trainer and educational entertainer, will show you how to enhance the user experience during virtual programs, reach new audiences, and expand library community relationships. Engaging patrons virtually is a challenge. Learn the tools that will build your audience and keep them coming back for more!

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. know the best practices to choose a presenter in the virtual environment.
  2. have a bouquet of ideas to choose from to grow an audience.
  3. build a template for introductions that build confidence with the audience. 

Presenter:

Martina Mathisen, Communication Skills Trainer

So You Want to Be a Library Director? Part 2

Track: Lead

You’ve decided to go for it! Your interview for library director is coming up and you need to prepare. This session will help you prepare for your interview, introduce you to commonly asked questions from library director interviews, and help you figure out how to answer them. This session includes plenty of time for Q & A.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. better prepare themselves to be library directors.
  2. learn common interview questions and how to answer them.
  3. get excited for the prospect of a new career opportunity.

Presenter:

Cathy Russ, West Bloomfield Township Library

Financing Library Construction and Improvement Projects

Track: Connect

Delve into the details on the types of projects that can be funded with bonds, different types of bond structures, and the Michigan laws that must be met when bonding for a capital project. In addition, learn about the timeline and steps of library financing and what to think about when undertaking a bond issuance, including the funding resource to repay the bond's debt service.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand available financing options for Michigan libraries.
  2. understand options when faced with a large project that needs to be funded.
  3. understand the questions to ask when considering a large capital project.

Presenter:

Nathaniel Watson, PFM Financial Advisors LLC

Internships Reimagined: Creating a Successful Remote Internship

Track: Reimagine

How do you provide an educational and worthwhile internship for both the intern and the library if you never meet in person or set foot in a physical library? This presentation will focus on how two Library of Michigan technical services staff were able to create an informative and educational experience by reimagining the traditional library internship and creating an exclusively online, remote alternative.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. have the knowledge and tools to construct their own remote internship program.
  2. decide whether a remote internship is appropriate for their library.
  3. explain how a remote internship differs from a more traditional in-person internship.

Presenters:

Stephanie Marshall, Library of Michigan

Jennifer Sasota, Library of Michigan

Not Just Talking Heads: Building Community Through Interviews

Track: Create

Media consolidation is a recognized problem for smaller towns that no longer receive coverage in local newspapers or other media outlets unless a negative event happens. Community spirit can dissolve as residents never hear about good things happening in their town. The Parchment Community Library's solution is a weekly interview series titled "Parchment Update." Community members can watch video interviews online or listen to audio podcast versions. This session covers the logistics of how to build community by developing your own interview series to let your local voices be heard.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. understand how to set up a series of video and/or audio interviews to bring information to their community and to enable the voices of their community to be heard.
  2. know what hardware and software are required to produce video or audio interviews.
  3. evaluate the most appropriate way to incorporate an interview series into their programming.

Presenter:

Karen Woodworth, Parchment Community Library 

Thinking Like a Journalist in a Library Setting

Track: Reimagine

It isn't getting any easier to compete for attention spans. More than ever, we need to get to the point quickly and coherently. A library's staff does quite a bit of writing on a daily basis--from social media posts to newsletters, to press releases and blogs--we tend to have a lot of "news" to "report." If we think like a journalist, it helps us structure our writing and effectively tell our library's story, while also improving our chances to get some good press from local reporters.

At the end of the session, participants will...

  1. be equipped to craft dynamic pieces of writing for social media, newsletters, blogs and beyond.
  2. appreciate the importance of coherently communicated information that prioritizes brevity.
  3. have a better understanding of how local journalists think and feel confident engaging and interacting with reporters.

Presenter:

Jeff Milo, Ferndale Area District Library

 


Session Evaluations

Breakout sessions and Lightning Talks will have evaluations embedded in a tab located in the right pane chat window. The evaluation takes only a minute to complete. After the event, an overall event evaluation survey will be sent to all attendees via SurveyMonkey. 

 


Discussion Rooms

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Coming Soon 

 

Thursday, October 14, 2021  

Coming Soon 

 


Lightning Sessions

What I learned about managing up in COVID panic mode

Sonya Schryer Norris, Library of Michigan

Storytime To Go: Making a Take Home Storytime Kit for Your Library

Kim Poma, Youth Services Librarian, Garden City Public Library 

Reimagining Transactional Customer Service

Shauna Anderson, Taylor Community Library

Nonboring Nonfiction: Engaging Young Readers with Hands-On Activities

Mary Boone, Chicago Review Press

It's a Wash: Library at the Laundromat

Lisa Alvarenga, Libraries Without Borders US

The MLA Mentorship Program Helped Us Both

Sarah Burchart, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Sonya Schryer Norris, Library of Michigan

Extra Hands on Deck: Successful Management of Library Volunteers

Wesleyann Johnson, Center Line Public Library

From Coach to First Class: Working with a Leadership Coach

Jennifer Dean, University of Detroit Mercy Libraries - McNichols Campus Library

Rethinking Summer Reading: Experiences vs. Numbers

Shauna Quick, Brandon Township Public Library

Out of the Office and Away From Home: Tips for Working From Just About Anywhere

Sophia Guevara, MLIS, MPA

 


Uniting the Michigan Library Community

MLA is proud to partner with organizations serving the library community.


Friends of Michigan Libraries logo