Sessions

Thursday, March 22, 2018

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Taking on the Challenge: Van Buren County Teen Creative Writing Challenge
Learn how to host a successful writing contest at your library! Topics will include funding, judge selection, rules, promotion, and multi-library cooperation. Jeffrey Babbitt created, developed, and launched the Teen Creative Writing Challenge in 2016. Inspired by the success of the multi-library GeekFest event in 2016, Jeffrey invited other library systems to participate in the Challenge in 2017, making the contest a countywide event.
Jeffrey Babbitt, Van Buren District Library; Whitney Hagen, Paw Paw District Library

Children’s Big Questions, and the Picture Books That Help Answer Them
Young children are constantly busy figuring out how the world works. In the process, they ask Big Questions, like “What is right and what is wrong?” and “What does it mean to be a friend?” They investigate these questions through play, by observing adults (and sometimes testing their limits), and by listening to stories. We will look at some of the picture books that help children discover positive answers to their questions.
Eric Hoffman

So You Want to Be in the Mitten Award Work Group? What Does It Take, Really?
Are you considering volunteering with the Mitten Award Work Group? Does reading and evaluating picture books sound like fun? Perhaps you've already been buying picture books for your collection. This can't be that much different, right? Covering aspects such as design, literary quality, art media, and new trends, plus the nitty-gritty of participating in the Mitten Work Group, we'll look behind the scenes at evaluating the picture book format within the context of the Mitten Work Group. Be ready to serve on an ad hoc award group as part of this breakout session!
Audra Eddy, Saline District Library

Let's Chat: Behavior Management for Children's Events
Dena Moscheck, Lapeer District Library; Mike Golczynski, Ionia Community Library

2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

YOU Can Use Puppets
Join Kevin as he explores all things puppet with us, to engage our young patrons during storytimes! Learn tips and tricks from his 20 years experience as a puppeteering author and illustrator, and leave feeling inspired and confident to incorporate puppets!
Kevin Kammeraad, Cooperfly Creative Arts

Is Your Library Ready to Code?
Clarkston Independence District Library won the ALA Libraries Ready to Code Grant (sponsored by Google) and we’ve just finished our first cycle. Come and learn about grant writing, coding in your library, and hear our hits and misses from the process.
Alexa Lalejini, Clarkston Independence District Library

Book Awards Behind the Scenes: How-To-Do-It With Examples
Have you always wanted to volunteer for one of these work groups but were afraid it was too much of a commitment?  Don’t be afraid!  It’s not as bad as you think.  If you love MFIC or YA, volunteer! The Chairs and/or Co-Chairs of these work groups will share with you how these groups decide what to read, the evaluation criteria and how the choices are narrowed down in this presentation. They will also share with you their 2017 work groups’ Hits and Misses as examples of how to evaluate children’s and young adult literature.
Tracy Bedford, Clarkston Independence District Library; Audra Eddy, Saline District Library; Jana Slisher, Portland District Library

Let's Chat: The Power of Collaborative Brainstorming in Youth Services Programming
Do you hear the phrase “we’ve always done it that way!” when it comes to program planning? Feel like you’re lacking enthusiasm for your programs and you can’t figure out why? Join this dynamic session that will focus on the power of collaborative brainstorming to create a framework to identify when it’s time to re-imagine or retire programs. Bring examples of successful and challenging programs from your experience to share. Leave with renewed enthusiasm and a personal learning network to continue learning beyond the conference!
Erin Davidson, Herrick District Library; Amanda Heidema, Herrick District Library

Friday, March 23, 2018

10:10 - 11:10 a.m.

Where Will We Pop-Up Next?
Join the Fowlerville District Library pop-up staff as we show you how we have created a successful pop-up library program. We will share how we were able to pop-up in our public schools and promote our library services outside the walls of our library. We will also present on how we have grown this program over the last four years and have increased what we offer our young adult patrons in our public schools.
Natalya Anton, Fowlerville District Library; Beth Lowe, Fowlerville District Library

Little Explorers: A Sensory Explosion!
You've probably heard of sensory play, but did you know that this type of play is very beneficial for children? From birth, babies learn about their world using their 5 senses. As they grow, children's senses are their most familiar and most basic way to explore and process new information. There are many sensory activities out there! Most of these stations can be created from at-home items or inexpensive goods. Come learn about how crucial sensory play is to Early Literacy and how easy it can be to add to any library program!
Tina Rossow, Clarkston Independence Dist. Library; Rosemary Retford, Clarkston Independence Dist. Library

Diversity in Youth Literature Part One: Picture Books & Early Chapter Books
We all know how important it is for kids and teens to see reflections of themselves in literature, especially written by members of their communities. We will discuss recent stand-out books for kids and teens, that are diverse in race, gender identity, learning and physical abilities. We'll share tips for curating diverse and inclusive library collections and look at publishing practices and underrepresented authors. Come with your best ideas and favorite recent titles!
Nakenya Lewis-Yarbrough, Belleville Area District Library; Katy Krump, Plymouth District Library

Community Supports for Youth in Crisis
This session will provide participants with information about the social services available to youth who are in crisis. Participants will also learn about HQ, the Runaway and Homeless Youth Drop In Center, located in the Heartside neighborhood of Grand Rapids, MI. Ways to support individuals who are in crisis or escalated will also be covered.
Demetria Phillips, HQ

11:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.

Diversity in Youth Literature Part Two: Middle Grade & YA
We all know how important it is for kids and teens to see reflections of themselves in literature, especially written by members of their communities. We will discuss recent stand-out books for kids and teens, that are diverse in race, gender identity, learning and physical abilities. We'll share tips for curating diverse and inclusive library collections and look at publishing practices and underrepresented authors. Come with your best ideas and favorite recent titles!
Nakenya Lewis-Yarbrough, Belleville Area District Library; Katy Krump, Plymouth District Library

Ready to Read Michigan: Resources for Michigan's Early Literacy Initiative
Achieve a better understanding on the Michigan Department of Education's Early Literacy Initiative, while learning how MeL.org and Library of Michigan Resources will support public library works in early literacy.
Cathy Lancaster, Library of Michigan; Christine Schneider, Library of Michigan

Fun for the Whole Family: Storytelling With Folktales
Storytime provides an invaluable resource for families, but selecting exactly the right stories to engage your audience (and keep them engaged!) can be a challenge, especially if you feel like you're out of ideas. For the days when you can't seem to find that perfect book to read aloud or want something extra special, try telling a folktale! In this presentation, we will demonstrate how to adapt folktales of all types to suit young audiences, use repetition and rhyme to encourage participation, and work with puppets, props, or even just your voice to tell the story.
Elizabeth Pearce, Ann Arbor District Library; Kayla Coughlin, Ann Arbor District Library

Stretch Your Storytime
Come along on a journey to season your storytime a little differently. In this session, you will learn the elements and design of a yoga-based storytime that beautifully combine with the five early literacy practices. Complete with a magic bowl, breathing ball, and freeze diamonds, you will learn to breathe and bend with books, poses, and songs suitable for young children and their caregivers. Learn to hold space, add structure, take a deep breath, and most importantly, have fun in your storytime!
Ashten Wilkey, Kent District Library

2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

PRIME TIME Family Reading Time...More Than a Free Dinner!
PRIME TIME Family Reading Time, a grant-funded humanities-based program, aims to engage families of non-active library users with storytelling and book discussions to promote critical thinking skills, as well as free meals, door prizes, and free books. James Nelson, Program Officer for Michigan Humanities Council, will discuss the grant application process, the criteria for selecting grants in Michigan, and training for the staff of selected sites. Librarians from two host libraries will discuss how PRIME TIME® has worked for them, what they learned, and how they improved the program each year, including the preparation and presentation of the program itself.
Jamie Babcock, Warren Public Library; Bethany Bruns, Farmington Community Library; Lisa Martin, Warren Public Library; James Nelson, Michigan Humanities Council

Breaking out of the Box for Kids, Teens, Staff, & Beyond!
The BreakoutEDU community has adapted the escape room concept for use in education. Buy their pre-assembled kit (or assemble your own) and register for a free account (no purchase necessary) to access hundreds of games for all ages, interests, and content areas. In this session, learn the basics of Breakout, how to adapt it for any space or budget, and best practices for using it in your library.
Janice Heilman, Howell Carnegie District Library; Elizabeth Norton, Commerce Township Community Library

Teen Mental Health: Become a QPR-Trained Gatekeeper
In QPR the general public is educated about the known warning signs of a suicide crisis: expressions of hopelessness, depression, giving away prized possessions, talking of suicide, securing lethal means, and then taught how to respond. As a QPR-trained Gatekeeper you will learn to recognize the warning signs of suicide, know how to offer hope, and know how to get help and save a life.
Sojourner Jones, Northeast Guidance Center

Let's Chat: Public School Collaboration
Let’s discuss on how to start and maintain a school library partnership no matter how big or small your district schools are. We can also talk about how to work with library media specialist and successfully implement and assess initiatives.
Jessica Anne Bratt, Grand Rapids Public Library


Register today!